One Young World flags flutter in Zurch, 2011 / Photo by Amanda Sennert

One Young World is looking for a few good men and women to volunteer to welcome delegates from around the world to our region from October 16-20. As we did during the G-20 Summit three years ago, we’re hoping to help OYW identify volunteers who speak languages other than English as well as hospitable Pittsburghers who don’t. If you’re interested in signing on, please contact VisitPittsburgh, which is helping to organize this effort.

OYW is expected to attract well over 1,000 young people for a sort of “Junior Davos,” a conversation about issues important to the future of people around the world.  They will be fanning out across the city and nearby suburbs for breakout sessions and meals.  OYW needs volunteers to help make it all go as smoothly as possible. Pittsburgh is the third city to host the summit, after London and Zurich.  Not bad company to be in.

Speaking of good company, our region has made yet another important list, ranked by Global Trade magazine among the Top 50 cities for global trade. The magazine notes that “Pittsburgh is truly one of the recent feel-good American export stories, having increased merchandise exports by 46 percent between 2009 and 2010. This is all the more impressive considering the Steel City no longer deals in steel. In fact, there is not a single steel mill in the city itself. Its redirection and recovery are due to a wide-ranging economic sector that spans from mining to technology, and finds major trade partners in Asia, Europe, South America and Canada.”

All true, although it’s worth noting that we still make steel around here, just no longer within Pittsburgh city limits.  In fact, Pittsburgh is the No. 2 center of metals industry production and employment in the United States.  It’s just that nowadays we do lots of other things well, too.

FoxNews.com has also weighed in.  Correspondent Shira Levine attended the Green Pittsburgh Media Study Tour in May, organized by the Pittsburgh Regional Alliance and VisitPittsburgh, and cites Pittsburgh as “one of the top revival cities.”

It’s great to be getting such national and global recognition. It’s also important to remember that it’s the result of a lot of hard work by a lot of people over a couple of generations, going all the way back to Renaissance One.

I’ve been thinking about this a little more of late. August 1 marked my 30th anniversary in Pittsburgh.  I came here to work for KDKA-TV at a time when there was every reason to doubt whether Pittsburgh could recover from the worst economic setback suffered by any region in the country in the second half of the 20th century.  People responded to the crisis and engineered a remarkable comeback.  There’s every reason to be proud of what’s been accomplished, but there’s also the risk of complacency, that we’ve closed the chapter on transformation and reinvention.

Fortunately, plenty of our friends and neighbors remain focused on reimagining our region.   A few weeks ago I spoke at the groundbreaking for the Pittsburgh Botanic Garden, an ambitious project to remake a strip mining site near Settler’s Cabin Park in western Allegheny County into the largest outdoor botanic garden in the United States.  The first trails are expected to open this fall, but proponents of the project acknowledge it could take three decades to compete.  To provide some encouragement, I noted that it took 30 years from the time civic leaders first began talking about building Point State Park until their successors turned the fountain on, and that the long road back from the bust of the ‘80s took a generation, too.

As the famous American architect and city planner, Daniel Burnham, once said, “Make no little plans; they have no magic to stir men’s blood … Make big plans, aim high in hope and work.” It could be a motto, of sorts, for the power of Pittsburgh to come together to overcome challenges and capture opportunities.

Make big plans a reality and, indeed, the world will beat a path to your door.